Author

(From a review of Many Heavens, One Earth)

“The essays in this much-needed book provide up-to-date reflections on religious themes and teachings that can help us think about the proper place of humans in earth’s ecosystems.  This book is at once readable enough for beginners and authoritative enough for use by scholars.  Dr. Cain has done a great service for religious scholarship and the world in writing this book.”

– Dr. Marti J. Steussy

Dr. Marti J. Steussy, Ph.D., is Professor of Hebrew Bible at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis, Indiana.

(From a review of Down to Earth)

“I love Dr. Cain’s unique approach to the study of and response to the environmental problems we face today. Drawing on his expertise as an environmental theologian, and with specialties in world religions and environmental ethics, Dr. Cain walks us through the sacred texts and thoughts of many of the world’s religions, seamlessly weaving their insights together with our most pressing environmental problems. With the simple clarity and directness of a master at work, he illustrates in very specific ways how these ancient texts and varied world religions speak profoundly still today, calling us to reflect and renew ourselves and our environment. One hopes this might encourage sustained dialogue, understanding, and action among our faith communities, in colleges and universities, and in the public square.”

– Dr. David Chandler

Dr. David Chandler, Ph.D., is Professor of Philosophy at Franklin College in Franklin, Indiana, and an occupant of the Johnson Chair in the Humanities.

 

(From a review of An Ecological Theology:  Reunderstanding Our Relation to Nature)

“To my knowledge there are no other primers like this.  There are books written by process   theologians who address this ecological issue or that issue, but not that pull so many strands together.   And there are few who write so clearly but who also find ways to speak poetically, when only poetry can convey truth. This is a wise and helpful work that is one of a kind.  If you are a Christian—or simply a religiously interested reader—who hopes that Christianity might become an ecological religion, read this book.”

–  Dr. Jay B. McDaniel

Dr.  Jay B. McDaniel, Ph.D., is Willis T. Holmes Distinguished Professor of Religion, Nancy and Craig Wood Professor of Engaged Education, and Director of the Marshall T. Steel Center for the Study of Religion and Philosophy at Hendrix College in Conway, Arkansas.

 

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Publications

Books:

A User-friendly Universe? (Zondervan/Thomas Nelson, 2016)

Re-vision:  A New Look at the Relationship between Science and Religion (Rowman and Littlefield, 2015)

Many Heavens, One Earth:  Readings on Religion and the Environment. (Lexington Books, January, 2012)

Down to Earth:  Religious Paths toward Custodianship of Nature. (Rowman and Littlefield, 2009)

An Ecological Theology:  Reunderstanding Our Relation to Nature. (The Edwin Mellen Press, 2009)

The Earth Is the Lord’s.  (Berea Press, 2003)

Stewardship, contributing editor, The American Baptist Quarterly.  (Judson Press, 1998)

Growing in Grace: Religious Stories for Children. (McGraw-Hill, 1992)

Sermon Collections:

Living the Faith for a Lifetime (2004)

Keeping the Faith (2003)

Envisioning Respect (2001)

What Manner of Person:  The Cardinal Virtues and Christian Faith Today (1995)

Faith Faces the World (1989)

The Intersection of Mind and Spirit (1985)

Articles:

“Down to Earth Theology,” The American Baptist Quarterly (winter, 2011)

“Dialogue Revisited:  A Conversation Between Karl Barth and Paul Tillich On the Occasion of Their 125th Birthdays,” Encounter:  Creative Theological Scholarship (fall, 2011)

“A Note on Mystery and Power in John Calvin:  A Commemorative Essay on the 500th Anniversary of His Birth,” Encounter: Creative Theological Scholarship (summer, 2009)

“Theodicy:  God and Evil” and “Religion and Ecology,” The Encyclopedia of Spiritual and Religious Development, edited by Elizabeth M. Dowling and W. George Scarlett, Sage Publications (spring, 2006)

“One or Many:  Responses to Religious Pluralism,” Interreligious Insight: a Journal of Dialogue and Engagement (winter, 2005)

“Nature as a Second Bible,” The Sewanee Theological Review (spring, 2004)

“Moses at Tambaram:  Religious Commitment in a Pluralistic World,” Prajna Vihara (fall, 2003)

“Spiritual Greening:  Melding Christianity, Ecology, and Sustainability,” Connecting to Place:  The Greening of the Campus (fall, 2003)

“Humbug,” Keeping the Faith, edited by Louis Harry, Guild Press (spring, 2003)

“Divorce, One-Night Stand, or Partnership:  A Window of Opportunity for Science and Religion,” Sanctuary, Volume II, No. 2 (summer, 2001)

“Stewardship as a Work of Art,” The American Baptist Quarterly, Vol. XVII, No. 1 (March, 1998)

“Turning the Church Green,” The American Baptist Quarterly, Vol. XV, No. 1 (March, 1996)

“You Gotta Have a Dream,” in Dreaming God’s Dream:  Celebrating the Life and Legacy of Martin Luther King, Jr., edited by Kenneth Sehested, Smyth and Helwys Publishers (1993).

“Ecology and the Gospel,” All My Relations:  An Environmental Studies Journal (1993)

“Patriarchy Or Partnership?,” Women in Ministry(1993)

“(Re)Discovering a Positive Christian View of Sex and Sexuality,” The American Baptist Campus Ministry Journal (1992)

“The Dialectic of Genesis 1 and 2: Toward a More Just Paradigm for Human-Earth Relations,” National Campus Ministry Association Journal (1992)

“Biblical and Theological Commentary on the Lectionary Readings for the Third Sunday of Lent,” The Liturgical Conference (1991)

“Biblical and Theological Commentary on the Lectionary Readings for the Feast of the Transfiguration,” The Liturgical Conference (1991)

“Biblical and Theological Commentary on the Lectionary Readings for the Third Sunday after Epiphany,” The Liturgical Conference (1991)

“Regarding Nature as Thou: A Reorientation Toward Eco-Justice,” Encounter:  Creative Theological Scholarship (1991)

“Repapering the Walls of the Soul:  The Church Should Back Education,” The Human Quest (July/August, 1989)

“Wisdom and Vocation,” The American Baptist Campus Ministry Association Journal (1986)

Omega: Some Reflections on the Meaning of Death and Afterlife,” Journal of Faith and Philosophy (1984)

“A Passionate God?,” St. Luke’s Journal of Theology (1981)

Book Reviews:

Key Questions About Christian Faith:  Old Testament Answers, by John Goldingay, in Review and Expositor (spring, 2012)

The Dialogue Comes of Age:  Christian Encounters with Other Traditions, edited by John B. Cobb, Jr., and Ward M. McAfee, in Reviews in Religion and Theology (winter, 2011)

Harmony:  A New Way of Looking at Our World, by HRH The Prince of Wales, in The Christian Century (fall, 2011)

Good and Bad Religion, by Peter Vardy, in Reviews in Religion and Theology (fall, 2011)

The Collected Sermons of William H. Willimon, by William H. Willimon, in Reviews in Religion and Theology (fall, 2011)

Creation:  A Biblical Vision for the Environment, in Reviews in Religion and Theology (summer, 2011)

Where Mercy Fails:  Darfur’s Struggle to Survive, by Chris Herlinger and Paul Jeffrey, in Reviews in Religion and Theology (January, 2011)

The Nature of Our Humanity, by Paul Jersild, in Reviews in Religion and Theology (October, 2010)

Beyond the God Delusion, by Richard Grigg,  in Search:  Science and Spirit (Nov./Dec., 2008)

Living Religions, seventh edition, by Mary Pat Fisher, for Prentice-Hall Publishers (2008)

A Guide to World Religions:  Exploring Faith through Film and Fiction, by Clinton Bennett, for Longman Press (2002)

Earth in the Balance: Ecology and the Human Spirit, by Al Gore, in Peacework (fall, 1994)

God’s Gift, Our Responsibility: Biblical Reflections on Creation, Christian Stewardship, and Corporate Responsibility, by J. Andy Smith, III, in Peacework (summer, 1994)

Loving Neighbors Across Time: A Christian Guide to Protecting the Earth, by Robert Parham, in Peacework (spring, 1994)

Iraq: Military Victory, Moral Defeat, by Thomas C. Fox in Ailanthus (1991)

Reclaiming a Mission: New Directions for the Church-Related College, by Arthur J. DeJong, in Ailanthus (1991)

Unapologetic Theology, by William Placher, in The Churchman (1990)

Sermons for Seekers, by Dennis W. Haas, in Ailanthus (1989)

Philosophical Explorations, by Steven M. Cahn, in The Churchman (1989)

Art Out of Agony, by Stephen Lewis, and Vanished in Darkness, by Eva Brewster, in The Journal of Canadian Culture (1985)

Making Peace in the Global Village, by Robert McAfee Brown, in Ailanthus (1982)